science / medicine / life

A Mission to Grow

National Parks Magazine / March 2017 / I’m well within the city limits of San Antonio, a few minutes’ drive from the throngs of tourists at the iconic Alamo and Riverwalk. But in every direction, fields — dry and brown as they hunker down for the mild Texas winter — stretch until they hit neat,Continue Reading A Mission to Grow

Hard-Knock Life

UAB Magazine / Fall 2015 / Two football players barrel toward each other, shoulders wide, muscles taut and engaged. There’s an audible crash, and then both players crumple to the ground, still and silent. Luckily—in this case—the collision victims aren’t expected to move. They’re crash test dummies, reenacting football’s hardest hits for UAB engineers atContinue Reading Hard-Knock Life

Surviving Melanoma

Stanford Medicine Magazine / Summer 2015 / It starts as a tiny dark spot on your calf or the crook of your neck or your back. It’s probably blotchy, like a Rorschach test, and if a doctor notices it, she is likely to take a second look. “I’d like to examine this one more closely,”Continue Reading Surviving Melanoma

Me, Meet Virtual Me

Backchannel / February 20, 2015 / You’re standing completely still in what you know is a nearly empty room, with an awkward headset covering your eyes and pressing down on your forehead. In front of you: an animated version of yourself. You lift one arm and the other-you lifts its arm. You turn your headContinue Reading Me, Meet Virtual Me

Going Under: Research on Human Consciousness

Stanford Medicine / Summer 2014 / One day this spring, Stanford anesthesiologist Divya Chander, MD, PhD, donned her scrubs, washed her hands, and walked into the operating room for a routine surgery. A resident anesthesiologist-in-training had already stuck flat, round electrodes on the patient’s forehead, and wires snaked from the electrodes to an electroencephalography machineContinue Reading Going Under: Research on Human Consciousness

The Mind as Medicine

UAB Magazine / Fall 2014 / Lying inside an fMRI machine that’s tracking her brain activity, a college student grasps a hot block in her hand. It’s just hot enough to cause her some pain—seven on a scale of one to ten, she tells a researcher. Above her, a picture flashes; it’s a snapshot of herContinue Reading The Mind as Medicine